PHOTOGRAPHY AS ARTIFICIAL MEMORY:
CONSTRUCTION OF THE PHOTOGRAPHIC SELF

M.A. DISSERTATION

The main objective of this text is to discuss the ways in which culture, in the form of images, feedsback onto the “self” constructing and representing it.

In order to address and demistify the nature of the photographic loop that sources from and is targetted to the neural self, this dissertation deals with relative positions of the self, the camera and the archive in seperate chapters.

The first chapter, aims to illustrate how processes of perception, memory and action endow the individual with selective strategies of survival and examplifies the means utilized by artificial content to reconfigure the brain.

The second chapter deals with the status of the camera as an instrument of prosthetic vision and tries to distinguish its role as a producer of motivated stimuli that is utilized by various discourses to propagate meaning.

The third chapter is intended to provide an insight into the inherent qualities of the archive, and meditate on the ways in which this broad compilation of visual information reconfigures the way the self experiences the world.

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